Moving Art

Moving Art

Moving Art

Moving Art

Online animation competitions are an essential method of generating exposure for amateur creators. Back at the dawn of YouTube, animation hits like “Peanut Butter Jelly Time” were fun to watch, but showed us that something serious could be achieved with the reach of the Internet. To date, Peanut Butter Jelly Time has been viewed more than 11 million times on YouTube. This is truly amazing considering that the animated short cost next to nothing in production expenses and was distributed and publicized for free.

Seizing upon this ability, video sharing websites have created competitions of varying reward levels. Some provide creators with exposure and little more, while others involve large cash prizes and potentially lucrative contracts.

Moving Art

Moving Art

Moving Art

One important innovator in this area is aniBoom. aniBoom holds yearly amateur animation competitions that reward 50 creators with prizes ranging from $10,000 in cash to free animation software. The aniBoom website also shows various videos that receive regular rankings in various categories, and which are posted mostly as short, funny clips.

aniBoom is also increasing in stature in the general animation industry, due to events like the Radiohead In Rainbows animated music video contest. This competition awarded several animators for original animated videos based on Radiohead’s music, and judges included members of Radiohead.

Other websites hosting animation competitions include Facebook, YouTube, and Famecast. Regardless of the type of awards, these competitions provide the exposure that is essential to getting noticed and getting hired. For animation creators with true talent and unique modes of expression, the Internet may be the fastest way to move their moving art up to the next level.

By Menucha Zimmerman
Article Source: ezinearticles.com